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luciddreamers:

Amazing drawings by John Kenn Mortensen from his book “Sticky Monsters”

(via haectemporasunt)

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2headedsnake:

Lori Nix

(Source: lorinix.net, via haectemporasunt)

Tags: long post
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supersonicart:

Kohei Nawa.

For an installation piece at the Aichi Triennale, Japanese artist Kohei Nawa used foam to give visitors the sensation of walking through the clouds at night:

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(via haectemporasunt)

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(via aberdeeen)

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rynisyou:

Caesarrrrrrrrr
(Quick doodle before I return to work because I miss drawing jojo)

rynisyou:

Caesarrrrrrrrr

(Quick doodle before I return to work because I miss drawing jojo)

(via volavolavolavola)

Tags: jjba
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ursulavernon:

sugarcookienebula:

~*UNICORNS*~ OvO

I love the last one. That’s a unicorn on a mission right there.

(via a-giant-spider)

Tags: long post
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electronicbrainpancake:

Original post
Tags: jjba
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witnesstheabsurd:

+ BRUTAL CANDY +

witnesstheabsurd:

+ BRUTAL CANDY +

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tombstonettromboners:

LET’S GO

STARDUST CRUSADERS ANIME TOO TOP-TIER, TOO GOOD

NOW EXCUSE ME, I HAVE TO GO WALK LIKE AN EGYPTIAN

Tags: jjba
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(Source: kuueater)

Tags: tentacles jjba
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fulifuli:

8-Bit Terrariums, by Jude Buffum.

(via haectemporasunt)

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yiq:

i got an alien zap on one of my two labrats >:3c

yiq:

i got an alien zap on one of my two labrats >:3c

(via witnessthesurreal)

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Tags: jjba
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malformalady:

Datura inoxia also known as Moon Flower. All Datura plants contain tropane alkaloids such as scopolamine, hyoscyamine, and atropine, primarily in their seeds and flowers. Because of the presence of these substances, Datura has been used for centuries in some cultures as a poison and as a hallucinogen.  Photo credit: © Dragan Todorovic

malformalady:

Datura inoxia also known as Moon Flower. All Datura plants contain tropane alkaloids such as scopolamine, hyoscyamine, and atropine, primarily in their seeds and flowers. Because of the presence of these substances, Datura has been used for centuries in some cultures as a poison and as a hallucinogen.

Photo credit: © Dragan Todorovic

(Source: Flickr / todorrovic)